Post-Earth psychology and the first Arts festival on Mars

Maybe Elon Musk should be sticking to Tesla and forgetting about SpaceX, but the way things go / are going, it’s likely that a colony will be built on Mars.

As much as I like I can bemoan the state of ‘technological progress’ which seems to be at the expense of life on Earth, whether that technology is on Earth or off it. However, once this dire state of affairs is acknowledged, there is no reason not to accept it and temper it appropriately towards more sustainable ends, however desperate that may seem. And some fun can be found in the despair.

As some human beings strive towards Mars, how can we make sure that any Martian colony does not become a place of privilege and prejudice? It is bound to happen to a degree, but if we lobby Musk from now onwards, surely we have a chance at ensuring that appropriate diversity in the colony is maintained. Not that he won’t have thought of this, but history has a way of falling into old habits.

The first Arts festival on Mars will be crucial. How diverse will it be? How will it reflect a united Earth, back to Earth, potentially making a purifying mirror of Mars, if only temporarily and artificially? Ideally, Mars could become a microcosm of the best of humanity on Earth. But…it could also become many other things.

For the first time, once babies are born off Earth, we will be able to truly speak of a post-Earth psychology. We will be able to observe and discern those elements of human psychology that are dependent upon us living on Earth, and those elements which are not so dependent. How fascinating will be the development of post-Earth psychology!

We should not be distracted from the task of healing Earth and ushering in the next stage of civilisation, post-capitalist, post-globalist, post-communist, post- most of what we are used to in contemporary human politics and culture.

Neverthleless, if Mars is happening regardless, let us go with the flow, as permaculturists, as environmentalists, as followers of the rivers of life. How can we use Mars to the advantage of Earth? It is guaranteed, there will be hidden paths opened up by the colonisation of Mars that although rocky and red, could paradoxically lead to a greater reparation of our dear Earth and the human culture within it. I don’t say this is likely, but it has to be possible. Because so much is possible.

Ideas #2 (maximising edge)

Positive affirmations: they only work if you imbue them with emotional content, and if you also work to manifest what they relate to. Otherwise they can result in internal conflict and soul-destroying disappointment.

Here are some positive affirmations and wisdom sayings I’ve used, some self-penned, some assimilated from elsewhere: ‘I am enough’ /// ‘I am innocent’ /// ‘I am fearless’ /// ‘Enlightenment is…total observation of Nature’ /// ‘Love is the Law, Love under Will’ /// ‘Enlightenment is…beginning everything with death in mind’ /// ‘Enlightenment is…total freedom from addiction’ /// ‘Character is greater than personality’ /// ‘The best heroes have a combination of vulnerability and strength’ /// ‘Anxiety and stress can often be a sign of doing too much or too little’ /// ‘Private victory before public victory’ /// ‘Victorious warriors win in their hearts before going into battle’ /// ‘Everything is me’ /// ‘The opposite of addiction is connection’ /// ‘Be proactive’ /// ‘Begin with the end in mind’ /// ‘I am not afraid to be a leader. I am not afraid to explore uncharted territories.’

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City-country conduits: Statistics like these show that the world’s population is increasingly urbanised. Articles like these show that humanity could be at risk of a major breakdown of civilisation either this century or the next. Since cities import most of their food, energy and water from outside the city limits, their densely-packed populations are more immediately at risk from a society-wide breakdown in economic and energy infrastructures.  I have long thought that the resilience of civilisation as a whole could be improved by establishing conduits between city and country in a way which increased understanding and communication between rural and urban populations, as well as flows of energy and resources both ways to reduce the impact of infrastructure breakdown on cities, and the potential burden on the country of fleeing urban citizens. This would in essence be a releasing of pressure on cities by ‘merging’ them better with their rural surrounds, but not in an environmentally destructive way. Regional food security is also implied in this vision, so that ideally, polyculture food growing systems would surround the city and provide all of its food needs (not a new idea). Most importantly I would like to see well-planned and sustainable mobility between city and country increased significantly. I smile at the prejudice of ignorance that exists between city and country dwellers. When I am in the city, sometimes even my most intelligent city friends may make ignorant remarks about rural dwellers and rural life, and when I am around my rural home, I will likewise hear fearful and ill-informed remarks about city-dwellers. This isn’t necessary! This kind of two-way prejudice will only make any serious large-scale infrastructure shocks -which as I’ve said are not unlikely this century- be felt worse and dealt with less efficiently.

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Ensuring Earth is fit for the next seven generations: This is the ‘7th generation principle’ of governance and human culture in general, as propounded by various Native American tribes. It is the idea that every human action and every human decision should have a benign or regenerative effect on the next seven generations of humans to live on the planet, by caring for Nature as a whole (that which supports us). By average modern understandings seven generations amounts to 7 x 25 years = 175 years. This benchmark of sustainability is often quoted in modern movements towards ecological living, but we don’t always stop to appreciate that seven generations is 175 years. Perhaps we should. I advocate sitting in meditation, alone or as part of a group, and trying to envision what the Earth might be like in 175 years. It is almost impossible to guess at, which is precisely the point. How often do communities, businesses and governments plan this far ahead? With the the increasing intelligence of our software, one hopes that more of this will be directed towards scenario planning and global strategy with Earth’s overall ecology at its core. If well-directed, and that means by human beings with deep empathy and experience of Nature, AI could be a force for greatness in putting the 7th generation principle into practice. It’s time to bring the wilderness into Silicon Valley!